Tag Archives: Comment

March ’17

Results

In a change to previous reporting I am moving from week/weeks to monthly stats. And no charts. Here are the results from March, beginning to end –

UK Dogs  Initial slow start to the month but then went on to a steady return. Overall good result with no changes to be made.

Markets = 1595
Bets = 10409
Volume =  £51949.79
Profit =  £59.65
Return =  0.115%

AUS Horses  The first half of the month saw profitable trading but the second half was all over the place with regular enough runs followed by sharp drops, streaks of losing markets, with no further profit added (this has been the same for the start of April). If this continues I will pause Aus trading.

Markets = 821
Bets = 6606
Volume = £62277.75
Profit = £26.55
Return = 0.043%

Comment
Steve commented –

The API crashing should have very little effect on a bots overall profitability other than the fact you’re missing out on opportunities when the site’s offline.

In a way, I agree. If I have an open position when the crash happens, I will either win or lose an unusually large amount for me. If this happens regularly, then, so long as I have enough cash in the bank, these wins and losses should roughly balance out. (This is stretching the view of chance and puts a lot of hope on a balance being seen across a relatively low number of events. I’d rather not rely on this to cover the effect of crashes.) Steve continues –

Every bet you place with a bot should be sent because you believe it to be value at that time and it should be allowed to stand on it’s own merits.

I think at this point Steve has missed my approach to the markets. With regards to the outcome of the event, I have no idea if my entry point is at “value”. This is because I have no interest or care of the event. It matters nothing to me if it’s dogs, horses, pigeons, camels, Pooh sticks or bottled messages that are racing. I am trading on the market movement, not the event. I believe my entry point has a statistical positive value if I can exit shortly after. Therefore, I never want a bet to stand “on it’s own merits” because it doesn’t have any merits (on it’s own). Look at it like this – I think the price is shortening and assume that there are willing backers and layers in the market. I effectively jump in between a backer and a layer, giving them both slightly poorer odds than they could have got and skimming a little bit for myself. That’s how I see it. Steve goes on –

I can understand the mentality of wanting a green book at the off but trading will always be easier to do manually rather than having some set time or ticks to balance your bets.

I disagree. Steve finishes with –

There’s a lot of easy money to be made botting don’t go wasting your time trying to tick for pennies.

In short – “trading will always be easier to do manually” even though “There’s a lot of easy money to be made botting“. With that logic any mouse clicking screen watcher should be raking it in. This I doubt. And the idea of  any easy money left on the exchange is one I don’t believe. But if you have found it, screw it for every last penny and don’t tell anyone.
 

A fellow PfB coder

Tony (@SportsBotter) commented –

Good to see you moving on to your own platform. I have had a go at it myself. At various stages I had to tick back what felt like most of the book. In a way making the mistakes forces you to understand how it all hangs together and what you need to change to implement your own strategies.

This is an important part of the learning process and can only be gained by doing the coding yourself. For those who just want to copy and paste the program, the ability to make it their own is reduced. As Tony points out, by making mistakes and then trying to find where you’ve gone wrong, you start to see how the modules come together, where variables get their data and then where and how that data is used/manipulated. Trying to skip this exercise will only make any future changes more difficult.

Now I am quite pleased that I can offer bets and cancel them just using basic non strategic triggers plus change the markets and periods that interest me etc. Quite confident I can now push on from this point with some trading techniques that I couldn’t be bothered to actually perform myself on a day today basis. Now if I can do it …with my reputation… then anyone can ;) 

The video shows an example of what Tony has created, something that fits his own criteria, using the Programming for Betfair code. He also has the Betfair site open so you can see the bets in the markets. Getting to this stage , with a working app, does give you confidence. I am now coding and testing my own bot following the same process that Tony has.

How’s it going?

Automated_trader commented –

How’s coding your own bot going? I got a copy of Programming for Betfair today so gonna try and code my own too. I’ve no coding experience other than a little VBA for my current bots that run on Gruss so hoping it won’t be too big of a leap into the unknown. Might even start a blog to document my progress too.

The coding is going really well with a bot now in testing. I doubt I’d have started without Programming for Betfair as I thought the amount to learn wasn’t worth it. The book helps by giving you everything you need to start auto trading, as in it gives you the code to request data, place bets and handle the responses from Betfair. It also gives you the basic tools to trade with such as profit take, fill/kill and stoploss. Once you’ve worked through the book, it’s just a case of adapting what you’ve learnt to get what you want.

My currently running and previous bots are written in VBA and running through Gruss. Before I started them I hadn’t written in VBA but picked it up from forums and searches. I hadn’t done any VB.net prior to this but understanding it isn’t that much of a leap. It’s the same style of object programming and the terms and layout are familiar after using VBA.

It’s true that any errors (after the corrections on the associated website are completed) are down to typos. A couple of times I thought it wasn’t me and something must have changed making the code not work. But it was me, with one mistake being a missing “A” in an url string. That took hours to find and I’d looked at the offending line of code more than once. Another biggy was missing a whole line of code, again taking forever to find. Sometimes the error message isn’t that helpful, not to me anyway. This one was an “overload” which, I’ve since found out, means you’re trying to put more variables into an object than you have declared. That’s what the missing line was, a variable declaration.

Some things to note, firstly, Visual Studio (VS) uses IntelliSense which highlights errors as you go. To begin with, this is quite annoying as you’ll finish a module and there’s a list of errors, so you spend time looking for what you’ve done wrong – which is nothing. The errors disappear when you complete the next couple of pages in the book. I found it’s better to ignore most of them until you get to a point where the book tells you to try running the code. The ones to correct as you go are missing or expected characters, such as “(“ expected.

Second – VS includes an autocomplete function. This will really mash your head at some points as you try to add a new declaration and it changes it to something else. If this happens, a quick tap on backspace should swap it back to what you typed.

Third – I find that the first run of the code after starting VS can sometimes fail. Just stop and run again. This problem goes once you publish your project.

If you enjoy coding you shouldn’t have any difficulty with it, just need patience. Let me know how you get on.